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If humans came with a care label, it would say “Performs Best When Exposed to Fresh Air, Sunlight and Water.” Too often, our lives are depleted of these essentials. Hook Life was inspired by moments when we come to life on the water. Our Moments blog captures them to enjoy when you can't be out on the water yourself. So please take a moment to enjoy and to share one of your moments with us.

Tag Archives: Dimitry time lapse painting

Lobster – Homarus americanus

 

Lobsters are the ocean’s spiders – ten-legged crustaceans skittering across the seafloor, crouching in crevices and under rocks. Found in all the oceans, lobsters range from the shoreline to beyond the brink of the continental shelf.

 

Typically 10-20 inches long, lobsters can live over 50 years, growing to 3 feet and over 40 pounds. They grow by molting – secreting enzymes that soften their shells and joints, struggling out of the old hard shell in a soft new one and absorbing water to grow by 20% – a miracle of nature in 15 minutes.

 

Lobsters feed on clams, mussels, crabs, starfish and small fish. They are formidable predators, with claws on their first three pairs of legs. The large front claws are powerful – a blunt and heavy crushing claw paired with a sharper, thinner claw for cutting. Lobsters have no teeth and chew food with three grinding molars in their stomachs.

 

To navigate the murky ocean bottom, lobsters rely on compound eyes with hundreds of lenses constantly in motion. They sense chemical “smells” with a pair of antennae and “taste” food with rows of fine sensory hairs that line their legs.

 

Today’s expensive meal, lobster was yesterday’s original trash food. Native Americans used lobsters as bait and fertilizer. The colonists found piles of them washed ashore and came to see lobster as a critical source of protein during hard times, but not as desirable food. Lobster eventually became known as the food of the poor, servants, prisoners and slaves.

 

The lobstering industry began in the late 18th Century with the advent of the lobster smack – a boat with a built-in live well to keep the catch fresh. In 1842, the first cannery was built in Eastport Maine and the industry spread quickly along the coast. Canned lobster was cheaper than baked beans.

 

Lobster’s culinary stock rose dramatically over time. With the growth of train travel, fresh lobster was introduced to Boston, New York and other centers of taste and fashion. The lowly lobster began to appear in the dining rooms and restaurants of discriminating diners. By the beginning of World War II, it was considered a delicacy.

 

Lobster trivia factoids:

 

The world record lobster caught off Nova Scotia weighed 44 pounds, was 3.5 feet long and at least 100 years old.

 

Like spiders and snails, lobsters have blue blood.

 

Free Download – Line Drawing for Coloring or Full Color Print

 

Lobster Color Print

 

Lobster Line Art

 

Share your colored version on FaceBook @HookLifeUSA and Instagram #HookLifeMoment

 

 

 

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Flying Fish Comes to Life

Take a moment to watch Dimitry bring the flying fish to life.

 

Flying Fish

Family – Exocoetidae

 

Flying fish can be seen soaring over warm ocean waters around the world.  These torpedo-shaped forage fish escape predators by accelerating to over 35 miles per hour and beating their tails rapidly to take flight.  Flying fish can glide over 200 yards at a time and over 400 yards in consecutive flights.

 

There are at least 40 known species of flying fish – omnivores that feed on plankton and other organisms in sunlit surface waters.  With their transparent wing-like fins, they are marvels of adaptation with a delicate beauty in flight.

 

Free PDF Download for a full color print or line art for coloring.

Flying Fish color print

Flying Fish line art

Share your colored version on Facebook @HookLifeUSA or Instagram #HookLifeMoment

The flying fish is featured in our EcoMotif  Water design

Check out and purchase the Water Bandana

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Harbor Seal Comes to Life

Take a moment to watch Dimitry bring a blank page to life for you.

 

 

Harbor Seal

The harbor seal, also known as the common seal, is a true seal found along temperate and Arctic marine coastlines of the Northern Hemisphere. Friendly and plentiful along the northeast coastline.
Here is a printable version of Harbor Seal.
HarborSeal

Here is a line art version that you can colorize.
Sealdrawing

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New! Sea Anemone Comes to Life

Take a moment to watch Dimitry bring a blank page to life for you.  Sea Anemone is the first in a series – more drawings coming soon.

 

Sea Anemone – Actiniaria 

 

Sea anemones are as colorful and graceful as the land flower they are named after.  But instead of petals, they have tentacles filled with venom to snare the fish they eat.  Close relatives of corals and jellyfish, anemones live on rocks and coral reefs – often in symbiotic relationships with green algae and clownfish (like Nemo!) that are immune to their venom.

 

Here is a printable version of Sea Anemone.

anemonefinish

Here is a line art version that you can colorize.

AnemoneLineDrawing

 

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